Book Review: Ballet Shoes by Noel Streatfeild

2251927Edition: Hardcover, 242 pages
Published by: Orion Books
Genre: Classics, Children’s, Fiction, Middle Grade, Realistic Fiction, British Literature
Rating: 4 stars
Completed: 19th February 2016

Pauline, Petrova and Posy Fossil are sisters – with a difference. All three were adopted as babies by Great Uncle Matthew, an eccentric and rich explorer who then disappeared, leaving them in the care of his niece Sylvia. The girls grow up in comfort until their money begins to run out and nobody can find Great Uncle Matthew.Things look bleak until they hit on an inspired idea: Pauline, Petrova and Posy will take to the stage. But it’s not long before the Fossils learn that being a star isn’t as easy as they first thought…

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Ballet Shoes follows three orphan Fossil sisters Pauline, Petrova and Posy who were adopted by eccentric explorer and enthusiast of fossils, Great Uncle Matthew (Gum for short). After Posy, Gum continued with his travels and left them enough money in the bank to last them for five years, however the money soon runs out and therefore the Fossil sisters took upon themselves to act on stage in order to earn a living to afford the bills of their house, as well as achieving their dreams.

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All sisters are very talented in different ways. Pauline can act and recite; Petrova is the tomboy out of the three sisters, clever with mathematics and is interested in cars and engines; Posy was born to be a ballerina, since her mother left her ballet shoes. Boarders, Dr Smith and Dr Jakes said to Pauline how unique the name Fossil is and that it would look splendid in history books. Afterwards the Fossil sisters decide to make a vow on every birthday and Christmas to put their name in history books because it is uniquely theirs and no one can say it is because of their grandfather’s.
Continue reading “Book Review: Ballet Shoes by Noel Streatfeild”

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Book Review: Nineteen Eighty-Four by George Orwell

UntitledEdition: Paperback. 368 pages
Published: Penguin Classics (3 Jan. 2013)
Genre: Dystopia, Science Fiction, Historic Fiction, Politics, Classics
Rating: 3.5 stars

Written in 1948, 1984 was George Orwell’s chilling prophecy about the future. While 1984 has come and gone, Orwell’s narrative is more timely than ever. 1984 presents a “negative utopia”, that is at once a startling and haunting vision of the world — so powerful that it’s completely convincing from start to finish. No one can deny the power of this novel, its hold on the imaginations of entire generations of readers, or the resiliency of its admonitions — a legacy that seems to grow, not lessen, with the passage of time. Continue reading “Book Review: Nineteen Eighty-Four by George Orwell”

Book Review: The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald

9357704Edition: Paperback, 148 pages
Published: Vintage Classics
Genre: Classics, literature, historic fiction, academic
Rating: 3 stars

This is a late review. Ever since the Great Gatsby film starring Leonardo DiCaprio and Carey Mulligan was released in 2013, I have been meaning to read it but I decided for not to read it because I’m not really a classics reader, so I didn’t think it was for me. But then my friend actually brought me the book as a gift, so it gave me the opportunity to finally read it.

This is probably my favourite line in the book and also a fantastic opening paragraph. (I have this obsession with amazing opening paragraphs.) Continue reading “Book Review: The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald”